U.K Trains Ghana Police Force – GUBA Awards
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Posted by: webadmin
Category: News

 

 

 

 

 

The Department for International Development (DFID) has launched a two-week tactical training course for some officers of the Ghana Police Service. This training is to enable them with vital skills and public order management in time for the December elections. The course is being led by the UK and begun on the 14th of May at the Police Headquarters in Accra. It is the first in a series of training programmes for 16,000 security officers drawn from the various security services. The training would be focused on election security and election laws with significant emphasis on intelligence gathering.

11 national communication base stations would be created across the country to enable nationwide radio communication for the police service. Speaking at the opening ceremony, the Country Director of DFID, Danny Graymore, observed that ‘Ghana has become a beacon of hope in the West Africa sub-region. Therefore Ghana must ensure that the police have the right skills and are positioned in the right place at the right time to make right decisions when the need arise while employing new tactics when new risks emerge’.

He urged that events should not be led to chance and plans need to be put in place in case of unforeseen circumstances and the police must remain bi-partisan and impartial to ensure peaceful elections.

John Kudalor, Director-General, Operations COP, expressed that the training could not have come at a better time since the police service was fervently preparing to ensure successful polls.  He added that although the police had chalked a lot of successes in its quest to maintain law and order to ensure that businesses thrive in a peaceful atmosphere, it needed such courses to enhance the professional posture of the service.

The Police chairman commended the UK government and the DFID for the immense support and commended their interest in building the capacity of the Ghana Police Service to attain a higher standard. He urged police personnel not to use force in managing public order, adding that the course would boost the capacity of the various Command and Control Centres (ops rooms) across the country.

So readers, what do you think of this initiative? What measures do you think that the Ghanaian government and its police force can do to ensure peaceful and fair elections? Your opinions are welcome.

 

By Claudia Andrea

Author: webadmin